Superiors of 34 Women’s Orders Call for Admission of Women to All Church Offices

As Kirche Leben Netz reports, the superiors of 34 women’s orders in Austria, Germany, Switzerland, and Luxembourg are calling for the admission of women to all church ministries and offices.

This declaration was made by the German-speaking members of the worldwide UISG – Internationale Vereinigung der Generaloberinnen / International Union of Superiors General – on Wednesday in Innsbruck.

The sisters call for a new “culture of dialogue, of participation, and of gender equality.” Increasing the proportion of qualified women would contribute to diversity and enrichment at all levels, they say. They note that religious communities could offer examples of “how men and women have worked and do work in brotherly and sisterly collaboration as a rich blessing for people.”

The UISG consists of 2,000 representatives of apostolic women’s communities worldwide with more than 900,000 members. It was at their initiative in 2016 that Pope Francis established a commission on women deacons.

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  1. View from the Pew:
    Regarding: “As Kirche Leben Netz reports, the superiors of 34 women’s orders in Austria, Germany, Switzerland, and Luxembourg are calling for the admission of women to all church ministries and offices.”
    – A great leap forward from the nexus of Piux xii and Mother Pascalina Lehnert who later became Pius’ director of his personal charity.

    – Pascalina and her two sister companions were the only women in the conclave of March 1939. It was at this conclave that Pacelli was elected Archbishop of Rome on March 2.

    1. I can’t find any record that says religious women participated in the conclave of 1939. Perhaps you know something the rest of us don’t? In any case, even if they did attend (perhaps as staff of the papal household, which is common), they almost certainly didn’t vote, per the 1904 apostolic constitution “Vacantis Apostolicae Sedis” which was in effect at the time.

    1. In principle, I agree. I recall Fr. Aidan Kavanagh OSB saying that we should adapt culture to liturgy, not the reverse.

      But I don’t hold to my principle absolutely and in a black-and-white way. I support Vatican II’s call for dialogue with the modern world, and its vision of a church that both confidently has the message and teachings of Christ and is on a journey to attain fuller truth. Sometimes the church learns from contemporary mores. For example, liberals and secular-leaning free thinkers in the 16th – 18th century thought that witches should not be burned, heretics should not be killed, there should be freedom of religion and freedom of worship. They were right, and the churches slowly had to come around to their truth, and see in it something that is (or should be) part of our Christian understanding. Other examples could be named.

      awr

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