Leaflet for Mass – Beginning of the Petrine Ministry of Francis

Is here.

Share:

31 comments

  1. I see that the “obedience” will not necessarily be made by all the Cardinals. I wonder whether this was due to Papal initiative or whether GuidoM realized what PieroM said in the NAC interview – that having everyone would increase the whole thing by at least an hour.

    The whole issue of the obedience made me take a look at the “Ordo Rituum” again, and I was surprised to see that the earlier rubric actually allowed for either the 12 delegates OR all the Cardinals present to make their “obedience”. I thought GuidoM had changed the rubric but apparently his intention was (from the original news reports) to use the alternative provided (“o secondo la opportunita’, tutti i Cardinali presenti”).

    Also, it seems the the Gospel is only being read in Greek, not Latin and Greek -a somewhat surprising feature. The moving of the rites for the pallium and the ring has seen the Laudes Regiae back to its usual format, more-or-less (I wonder who did the booklet English translation with the “governeth”, etc. or whether they took it from the Internet somewhere)

  2. Joshua Vas : I see that the “obedience” will not necessarily be made by all the Cardinals. I wonder whether this was due to Papal initiative or whether GuidoM realized what PieroM said in the NAC interview – that having everyone would increase the whole thing by at least an hour. The whole issue of the obedience made me take a look at the “Ordo Rituum” again, and I was surprised to see that the earlier rubric actually allowed for either the 12 delegates OR all the Cardinals present to make their “obedience”. I thought GuidoM had changed the rubric but apparently his intention was (from the news reports) to use the alternative provided (“o secondo l’opportunita’ tutti i Cardinali presenti”). Also, it seems the the Gospel is only being read in Greek, not Latin and Greek -a somewhat surprising feature. The moving of the rites for the pallium and the ring has seen the Laudes Regiae back to its usual format, more-or-less (I wonder who did the booklet English translation with the “governeth”, etc. or whether they took it from the Internet somewhere)

  3. I see that our Holy Father probably won’t be singing anything. They have a cantor intoning the Gloria. 🙁

  4. In the English translation provided (page 12), “Sancte Pie Quinte” is translated as “Saint Pius X” – Vox Clara?

    1. @Jordan DeJonge – comment #9:

      I say this a little tongue-in-cheek, but I’ve rarely met a Jesuit who sings anything at Mass. I’ve been trying for almost two years to get our Sunday presiders at Marquette to sing. I’ve concluded that they must not have any musical training during formation, but I really don’t know.

      1. @Timothy Johnston – comment #17:
        This particular Jesuit, who can sing and has significant musical training, is ambivalent about singing at Mass. For three reasons:
        a) a simple chant requires quite a lot of skill for it not to sound monotonous
        b) if it’s done well, it shows up the majority of clergy who do not have that skill and cannot realistically be taught it, and draws attention to the presidential skill in a way that is hard to handle
        c) the chant flattens the music that’s present in any good liturgical text.

      2. @Philip Endean Sj – comment #19:
        During Lent, I’ve been chanting penitential rite C. I’m not a particularly good singer (no one is swooning in fits of aesthetic delight), but it’s not a particularly demanding melody. The difference is in the volume of the congregation’s response, which is about twice what it is when the penitential rite is spoken. For whatever reason, the chant seems to elicit a more robust response.

        So I guess I remain unconvinced by your three reasons for not chanting. Maybe if I were a better singer, (b) might be a consideration.

      3. @Fritz Bauerschmidt – comment #20:
        The late Aidan Kavanagh used to have an amazing hyperbolic quote to illustrate his view of singing in the liturgy. I forget what it was exactly, but it was something to the tune of “though a singing bishop is a cross to be borne infrequently and one can fall back on the gospel with a bad preacher, a deacon and priest that does not sing is like a reader who cannot read.”

      4. @Fritz Bauerschmidt – comment #23:

        Just think, if the ability to sing the chants were to become a prerequisite for ordination – but only for ONE order, the Order of Deacons – in time all priests and bishops would also be chanting.

      5. @Joshua Vas – comment #21:
        “While one can bear a liturgical president who cannot preach since there is always the gospel to fall back on, and while a singing bishop is usually a cross that need be borne infrequently, a deacon who sings badly or a president who does not even bother are afflictions none can avoid. A deacon who cannot sing is like a reader who cannot read, a presbyter (which means elder) without age or wisdom, a bishop (which means overseer) who cannot see, a president who cannot preside.” (Elements of Rite: A Handbook of Liturgical Style, 31-32)

      6. @Fritz Bauerschmidt – comment #20:
        I agree that simple, resonant chant induces a huge response from the congregation. When I am cantor, I choose to intone the Psalm. In the beginning, I did this because I was lazy or didn’t have time to learn the music handed out. But I get much better response from intonation than those who sing written music. I think this is primarily a function of a simple, clear melody that is more or less the same every time I do it. With written music, it usually takes the congregation 3 verses to properly learn the response. By then, it is usually over. With intonation, they know it from the beginning; they want to sing if they can do so without embarrassing themselves.

    2. @Jordan DeJonge – comment #9:

      I’d presume that with one lung Pope Francis has barely enough breath to speak.

      Per the leaflet of the inaguation Mass, the incipits of the Gloria and Credo will be sung by a cantor (c.f. p35, il cantore).

      This is of no consequence, as the OF has removed the absolute requirement that the celebrant sing the incipits.

  5. I’m watching the Saint Anna Mass as I type this with the Holy Father and as at the Sistine Chapel, the free standing altar is in the Benedictine fashion, six candle sticks, angled on the sides of the altar with a crucifix facing the celebrant dead center.

    The Holy Father wears a different miter, plain but a bit more elegant than the one he had at the Sistine Chapel. He wears an amice (which I don’t) and a nice full alb with a hint of lace at the bottom of the alb and sleeves.

    He just gave a stunning five minute homily, down to earth, simple and about mercy and God not tiring of offering us His mercy although we tire of asking for it time and time again.

    1. @Fr. Allan J. McDonald – comment #10:
      Bombshell: The Holy Father distributes the Hosts to the two deacons as they kneel before him and by way of intinction. But the Holy Father and none of the other bishops distribute Holy Communion to the faithful! Two deacons are distributing only the Hosts to the congregation at the center of the church as they kneel to receive. This is very odd!

      His Holiness is very down to earth, acknowledged a South American priest who works with street people and then processed out of Saint Anna’s and greeted people outside the Church as any parish priest would and the parishioners kissed his ring, genuflected, hugged and kissed him. I would say this pope is not Argentinian but very, very Italian! Good for him!

      1. @Fr. Allan J. McDonald – comment #11:
        We saw this at the Sistine Chapel: I assumed there it was logistics but it looks as if it might be something more. I hope this does not indicate poor health on the part of the Holy Father, but I also wonder whether Marini came up with it because of the kneeling posture for Communion. If so, I hope it disappears since the structure and symbolism is lost IMO by not having the presider, or at least one of the priest concelebrants distribute Communion.

      2. @Joshua Vas – comment #12:
        There may have been other priests distributing Holy Communion elsewhere outside of the range of the camera but the two deacons were dead center and two kneelers were brought forward for the laity to kneel. Most received on the tongue some kneeling received on the hand. But the Holy Father and the main concelebrant bishops did not distribute Holy Communion.

      3. @Fr. Allan J. McDonald – comment #13:

        Did Francis remain in view of the camera and watch the distribution take place before him, or could he have been distributing Communion elsewhere off-camera?

      4. @Peter Rehwaldt – comment #14:
        As soon as he gave Holy Communion to the deacons who knelt to receive by way of intinction with Msgr. Marini holding the chalice (by the way he gave the sign of peace to Marini too!) he sat down at the presiding chair in full view of the camera and was in full view of the camera as the camera focused on the deacons distributing Holy Communion (no chalice or intinction) to the laity as the laity knelt to receive!

        BTW, I think the Holy Father is totally incapable of carrying a note, evidently, because another bishop sang “The Mystery of Faith” and that same bishop began the “Through Him…” The Lord’s prayer was not chanted nor the Credo, but both spoken. All the other parts of the Mass were sung in Italian and the Eucharistic Prayer which was III along with the Preface were said in Italian.

  6. You might want to focus on something other than *singing or chanting* – found Fr. Endean’s reasons to resonate with my experience although I did chant during certain seasons or feasts. Would add – my choices often reflected the congregation and the church setting e.g. acoustics, sound system, etc. I have two parents who have severe hearing loss – chant and singing all but eliminates their ability to hear the words, etc. They do enjoy singing hymns, etc. but when it comes to presider prayers, etc. They also don’t necessarily want to be forced to read everything – they want to listen and participate.

    Link: http://ncronline.org/blogs/ncr-today/pope-stresses-simplicity-ecumenism-inaugural-mass-plans

  7. Since one never heard of an Orthodox or Easter Rite priest or deacon who couldn’t (or wouldn’t) sing every last word of the liturgy, there is something else patently at work here than the pitiful ‘I can’t’, the arrogant “I won’t’, and other such absurd and irrational excuses. There are a very, very, few people who are tone-deaf or actually a-musical. Research has revealed them to be a statistical rarity. The problem here is a culture that breeds unmusical people and (in quite a few) antipathetic attitudes to music. The reason that Eastern liturgy is always sung by all involved is that none of their people ever hear it any other way and they learn it from the cradle up. Ditto the famed singing of many Anglican, Protestant and Evangelical churches. We can do something about this disgrace if we wish, and the place to start is making sung liturgy the norm that Vatican II wishes it to be, that it has been historically, and making spoken liturgy the queer abnormality that it really is.

    1. @M. Jackson Osborn – comment #26:
      Since one never heard of an Orthodox or Easter Rite priest or deacon who couldn’t (or wouldn’t) sing every last word of the liturgy,

      The Orthodox maintain the tradition of simply not ordaining men who can’t or won’t sing (which used to be an impediment to Holy Orders in the west as well.)

      1. @Samuel J. Howard – comment #27:
        How right you are. I do recall that Isidore of Seville, for one, held that a man who could not sing should not be ordained. Still, as I intimated above, there is a scandalous cultural deficit at work here in our churches, and we should, as a metter of conscience, do something about it… starting with formal singing classes beginning in kindergarten.

  8. It was announced at the press briefing this morning that only deacons will be distributing communion. Something about “simplicity.” (Also no procession with gifts.)

    With the Laudis Regis, pallium and ring, and presentation of 6 cardinals, I would think this could have been enough of a reason to omit the penitential rite. But the book for the Mass seems to see the giving of the symbols of office as a ceremony completely independent from the Mass.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *