The entire texts of the extended form of the Pentecost Vigil

I have worked out the entire extended form of the Pentecost Vigil with all the texts in place.

Here are the the Word document and the PDF version.

The PDF version has the correct glyphs for the versicles and the responses. Please get back to me if you find any mistakes.

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19 comments

      1. Paul – this is a tremendous amount of work. Would love to have this in our diocese and parish. This really seems to capture and expand scripture, church & liturgical history, the idea of ressourcement, etc.. Sure beats having a 2PM Missa Cantata in the EF Form as if that really adds to the solemnity.

  1. Thank you–from a lover of the Pentecost Vigil! We have at least one parish that’s doing the extended vigil, and I’ve sent this on to them. How about other dioceses–what reports do you have of parishes celebrating the extended vigil?

  2. We celebrated the extended Pentecost Vigil at Holy Cross (Fort Worth Diocese) for the first time last year. I was really wonderful, and we are doing it again this year.

  3. “Extended vigil”, by that do you mean combining Ist vespers with the four readings and then the Mass? I know of some places which say the old 12 lessons from Easter eve and bless the font as part of their “extended vigil” of Pentecost. Which,as I vaguely recall, was the rule before the vigil of Pentecost was almost reduced to little more than a liturgical commemoration.

    Now put that older rite into the vernacular and, despite the length of it, the parish may come to love it for its incomparable beauty.

  4. Thanks, Paul. I notice the image of fire that you place after each reading. I was doing some online research about the Vigil of Pentecost, and one source suggested that after the first reading two fires should be lit. After the subsequent readings, four would be lit. Is this normal practice? What is the significance?

    1. I was wondering when I would be asked that question. In the practice of the Vatican at its outdoor vigil Mass, there are fourteen torches (one for Mary, one each for the eleven apostles, one for Justus, and one for Matthias—is that the explanation?).

      1. Acts says “they were all gathered” which could mean as many as 120. Or it might mean the strange “Peter and the Eleven” as Luke puts it.

        I would bet on Rev 1:20, the seven stars and seven lampstands. It matches the 14 lights of the Tenebrae?

  5. Pax et bonum!
    Dear brother, good work!
    Did you use some official english translation or a translation of yourself of the latin text?
    Here, in Brazil, we’re waiting till today the translation of the editio tertia.
    God bless you!
    A holy Pentecost!

  6. Bill,

    Come and visit us next year, as we will be doing the Vigil
    next year. While we didn’t do them this year, I am going to
    be scheduling it for next year. We will begin the tradition and
    would love to have you be a part of things here. I will not go
    into the reasons we chose not to do it this year, but will work
    on it for next year.

  7. Okay – sounds good. How do you get to do these things when our parish is moving backwards marching to the ROTR and NLM folks while attendance and participation falls through the floor.

    Funny how things can be so different only a few miles apart and in a rather medium size diocese with a limited number of pastors?

  8. Jim McKay :

    Acts says “they were all gathered” which could mean as many as 120. Or it might mean the strange “Peter and the Eleven” as Luke puts it.
    I would bet on Rev 1:20, the seven stars and seven lampstands. It matches the 14 lights of the Tenebrae?

    Sounds plausible to me. Any other thoughts from anyone else?

  9. Is anyone anywhere creating a new three-year “use” Gradual based on the Revised Common Lectionary? Hopefully this would be in Rite One or King James English.
    Regards,
    Troy Scott, MM, organist-choirmaster for St. John’s Episcopal Church, Laurel, MS

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