UPDATED: US Musical Settings of the Revised Order of Mass

Michael Silhavy from the Archdiocese of St. Paul/Minneapolis, graduate of Saint John’s School of Theology·Seminary, has done great work indexing published settings of the new Mass text. We welcome your additions and corrections.   –ed.

U.S. Settings of the Revised Order of Mass

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  1. At the ongoing CMAA Colloquium it was announced that among Pittsburgh NPM leadership, Fr. Chepponis offered as how it might be time that those two “guilds” establish a formal relationship of sorts. That was met with a clearly hopeful, welcomed and positive response at the plenum dinner.
    The absence or acknowledgement of settings by Corpus Christi Watershed composrs, or others affiliated with CMAA and even mentioned at PTB already gives the clear appearence or inference of a closed-shop atmosphere. So, are commercially available settings (as opposed to those in the Commons for free) the only ones passing muster as suitable for consideration?
    Nah, just my ‘magination once again…

    1. Charles,

      You raise a good point. My sense is that some published settings are pretty good and a lot of them are lousy. And some online settings are pretty good and a lot of them are lousy. I’m heading up a reading session at CCMLA conference next week and I’m purposely including some online materials – e.g. Jacob Bancks, and Douglas Mews from New Zealand.

      Out of fairness to Michael Silhavy, the amount of work he has done so far on this is huge. I’m sure he’d like it as much as I would if someone were to catalog the online settings. And PTB will be happy to post it!

      Calling all catalogers…

      awr

    2. A few points…the list that will appear on the NPM site has already been expanded from the list that appears here. (For instance, CanticaNova titles have been added.) And Mr. Culbreth, please note my first disclaimer: this is a work in progress and many other publishers need to be heard from. I’d be happy to receive links or printed copies of the Masses. My address and email are included. As far as limiting this to “published” settings, I think that creates a reasonable standard. This assumes at least one other person beside the composer – at any publisher or composers’ collective – felt there was merit to the catalouged work. We just can’t list every Mass setting that is hand written with note heads the size of dimes by some well meaning person. If truly exceptional pieces that are unpublished appear, I’d be happy to list them knowing that they are no doubt soon destined for a publisher.

      1. I think this:

        >> We just can’t list every Mass setting that is hand written with note heads the size of dimes by some well meaning person.

        seriously misunderstands the phenomenon of micro-publishing, and also greatly insults (or at least, completely ignores) the ridiculously high quality of Corpus Christi Watershed.

  2. This is very helpful, however I wonder if I can make a simple suggestion. In the font used the abbreviations for the Glory to God (Gl) and for the General Intercessions (GI), look identical, I know the order is consistent and that can be used to distinguish between the two, but perhaps a slight change to the one for the General Intercessions will make it easier to distinguish between the two at first glance.

    Just to assist in keeping it as up to date a possible. The Psallite Mass has settings for the Creed as well as Lord’s Prayer.

    A question I have looking over all the settings, none of them have settings of the Creed, which surprises me. I have always viewed the Creed not as just a doctrinal statement but a beautiful way for the Church a prayer to join together in a renewal of their baptismal faith. A way to rejoice in that.

    1. They are not “General Intercessions” any more. RM3 calls for “Universal Prayer” [cue Star Trek/Wars music, please!] or “Prayer of the Faithful.”

    2. Some do have a sung Creed. Jubilation Mass comes to mind. I know there are a few others, not to mention Mass settings of the past, which could easily be adapted – with permission no doubt. Two that come to mind are Mass of Christ the Teacher by Connolly (GIA) – I used this at my previous parish for Christmas. The refrain is Latin and the verses are chant. Second
      is Mass for Christian Unity, which is very nice.

  3. Mr. Silhavy, please call me Charles.
    I’m in the sink hole of a major sinus infection during the CMAA colloquium and it may have appeared to you I was impugning your work. Very sorry for that, not the case. Trying to keep m’ mind on track is tough without an illness.
    Rest assured, the settings I’m speaking of are of the highest calibre in artistry, beauty and engraving. None are from my pen (Finale) btw.
    Thanks for your work, Michael!

  4. Further updating: The Psallite Mass: At the Table of the Lord, in addition to the Creed (Apostles’ as well as Nicene) and the Our Father that Jeffery Bebeau mentioned, also contains settings of the Berakah prayers and “Blessed be God for ever” acclamation — we believe the only setting to do so thus far — and the Easter and Pentecost Sequences (also, we think, a first).

    The main parts of the Ordinary (Gloria, both Creeds, Sanctus, Memorial Acclamations, Agnus Dei) not only have English and Spanish texts, as notated on Michael’s list, but Latin ! The published score for some items (Our Father, Agnus Dei) will include other languages: French, Tagalog, Vietnamese….

  5. That Psallite Mass is just wonderful! I highly recommend it.

    I’ve been largely disappointed by the offerings from the major publishers, as you can read it about in my reviews of OCP‘s and GIA‘s new settings.

    WLP has sent me a boatload of material, which I am still trying to work through, but it seems to be the best of the “Big Three.” I will (enshallah) one day be able to post reviews on those.

    I’ve also gotten a chance to look at a lot of settings from independent composers, and (much like Indie music in any other field) I think that’s where the real genius is. Unfortunately, institutional decision makers are always afraid of solutions that don’t cost enough money.

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