NABRE: Revised Edition of the New American Bible

The USCCB is reporting that the Revised Edition of the New American Bible (NABRE) has been approved for publication and will be available on Ash Wednesday (March 9, 2011)‎. I am most struck by the statement that the NABRE is approved for private use and study. It will not be used for the Mass, which uses an earlier, modified version of the NAB translation. Deo gratias! At least I don’t have to budget for new Lectionaries in addition to the new Missals.

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  1. Expense aside, I wish we could have a new lectionary. Apparently someone or some committee decided that the readings all had a word limit on them. Whether it’s a poor translation or whether that’s just his style, the letters of Paul have some very convoluted sentences and a paragraphs. More often than not, the actual reading makes no sense because it refers to a prior statement that isn’t read. If the Mass has to be kept at an hour, maybe we could trim the homily and give Paul another minute or so to make his point.

  2. Chase, the April 2010 Committee on Divine Worship NEWSLETTER states: “This text will become the English-language Psalter to be used in all future liturgical books, including the sacramental rites and the Liturgy of the Hours.”

    That means that the RGP will not actually be “mandated” for liturgical use until it appears in a new edition of a liturgical book. But the text MAY be used immediately, if an individual or a publisher wishes to do so, for instance, in a responsorial psalm setting. But the RGP won’t actually appear in liturgical books until new editions of those books are published. And no one knows for sure when that may be. The USA’s Lectionary for Mass will eventually be revised, and when that happens the RGP translation will be used for the responsorial psalms. But that most likely will not occur until several years from now.

  3. I presume that the revised edition will follow the standards of the original 1970 Old Testament and the 1986 revised New Testament with a mostly formal- rather than dynamic-equivalent (but flat) translation with moderately inclusive horizontal (but not vertical) language.

  4. People, isn’t the USBCDW actually reviewing the US text of the Lectionary currently? You guys will still need to buy a new edition of the Lectionary when they are done and Rome grants the recognitio. Of course, no one knows when that will be at the moment.

    By the way, the convoluted sentences in St Paul’s letters in the US Lectionary come from the NAB (1986 RNT). Unless I’m seriously mistaken, the NABRE still uses the 1986 RNT, so no much changes there!

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