Mark Francis on the Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy

The reform of the liturgy set in motion by the first document of the Second Vatican Council, Sacrosanctum Concilium, was a harbinger of the renewal announced by later documents of the Council especially those that explored the nature and mission of the Church, the place of the Bible in Christian life, ecumenism and evangelization. This session will discuss how the liturgy, renewed according to the principles of worship articulated in the Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy, can be seen as a summation of the Council’s attempt at dialogue with the modern world.

Read more

How a Lutheran Cardinal-Elector Might Vote

I received an email recently that rocked me to the core, first with laughter, and then with much more seriousness. It came from a Roman Catholic friend, inviting me to share “what a ‘Lutheran elector’ would be looking for in the next pope.” Is there some cardinal, anxious to hear a word from faithful voices beyond the boundaries of the Roman Catholic church? I can’t imagine a Lutheran being invited personally inside the conclave as an elector, or even as a delegate-observer. But perhaps it is not too much to dream that insights from a Lutheran might be taken into consideration, even if spoken in the quiet pre-conclave conversations in which the real electors are engaged and not during the conclave itself. So I replied to my friend, and thought I might share those reflections more publicly here as well, as they touch on much of what PrayTellBlog readers regularly discuss.

Read more

O’Malley on Faggioli on Liturgical Reform… and why some people are attracted to the old missal

by Timothy O’Malley
“is it really the case that many of those attracted to the 1963 Missal of John XVIII (the extraordinary form) are dismissive of the ecclesiology brought about by the Second Vatican Council? Or is it not often true that those fascinated by ‘the reform of the reform’ are disenchanted with certain features of the implementation of the reform itself?”

Read more

A Reformation Meditation for Those Who Shape Worship

In a time of liturgical questions, changes, challenges, reforms, and reforms of reforms, filled with arguments, disputes, power plays, and power players, perhaps a bit of psalmist-inspired Reformation perspective is in order. If it worked for 16th century Martin Luther and 20th century Roman Catholic hymnal editors, perhaps we 21st century folk can profit from it as well.

Read more
1 2 3 4