The Liturgical Reform and the ‘Political’ Message of Vatican II in the Age of a Privatized and Libertarian Culture

“From a theological point of view, today it is difficult to utilize the ideas of ‘society’ in the pre–Vatican II liturgical movement because they lack the whole ecclesiological context of Vatican II, which gives the idea of the liturgy and its ‘social culture’ a different flavor. We must restore the link between liturgical reform and social justice, but this is viable only in the context of a theology that does not ignore Vatican II.” – Massimo Faggioli

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O’Malley on Faggioli on Liturgical Reform… and why some people are attracted to the old missal

by Timothy O’Malley
“is it really the case that many of those attracted to the 1963 Missal of John XVIII (the extraordinary form) are dismissive of the ecclesiology brought about by the Second Vatican Council? Or is it not often true that those fascinated by ‘the reform of the reform’ are disenchanted with certain features of the implementation of the reform itself?”

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This Week’s Discussion Question: Neo-Augustinian vs. Post Vatican II Thomist perspectives on liturgical reform and renewal

“Neo-Augustinian” approaches to the liturgy tend to view it in Platonic terms, the heavenly worship offered to the Father by the Son in the unity of the Spirit, joined in by the angels and saints, in which those on earth are privileged to gain some share by grace. “Post Vatican II Thomist” approaches to the liturgy would tend to view it in Aristotelian terms, a “complexus of sensible signs,” an earthly disclosure through culturally and historically conditioned semiotic systems of the graced condition of the world.

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