Clarifications and a Wake-Up Call Concerning Traditionis Custodes

In a communication addressed to the presidents of bishops’ conferences around the world, the Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments has responded to a series of dubia concerning restrictions on the use of the liturgical rites that antedated the liturgical reform of the Second Vatican Council.

The clarifications offered and the letter introducing them double down on the restrictions initially given in the motu proprio, Traditionis custodes, and show that the Vatican is serious about enforcing them. Many of the answers to the eleven questions are supplied with an explanatory note that provides more information about what may or may not be done in a given area.

Perhaps even more important than the individual particulars given in this document — which is an authoritative response to questions that have been raised about the implementation of the motu proprio, and is given with the Pope’s approval — is the restatement of the fact that the motu proprio has outlined “the direction in which we wish to move.”

The positive direction underlined by this communication is the ongoing, fruitful reception of the liturgical reform itself, and deepening the Church’s unified assent and adherence to it. As Archbishop Roche clearly states: “We are all called to rediscover the value of the liturgical reform by preserving the truth and beauty of the Rite that it has given us.”

As such, the communication is a wake-up call to bishops, not only to implement the particulars of the motu proprio scrupulously, but also to grasp its spirit and support its direction.

You can read the full text here.

— rf

2 comments

  1. “As such, the communication is a wake-up call to bishops, not only to implement the particulars of the motu proprio scrupulously, but also to grasp its spirit and support its direction.“

    Why wasn’t this the case with, say, Ecclesia Dei or Summorum Pontificum?

  2. And will the more progressive elements in the Church themselves now fully embrace the reformed liturgy by removing the de facto restrictions that prevent a fully traditional and legitimate form of celebration of the reformed Mass?

Comments are closed.