Walk Humbly with Your God

More from Pray Tell Live, at the NPM National Convention! This conversation is with Laurence Rosania, about his recent composition, “The Song of Micah” (OCP). (It was filmed on August 1, 2013.)

5 comments

  1. These are wonderful words to be on our lips!!! I’d like to see his piece and any other piece that uses this text.

  2. I’m confused. Hebrew is a sacred language? While I believe it is used primarily for pray and study, there are many Jews throughout the world who speak modern Hebrew. If congregations are confused when they hear ‘Gloria in excelsis Deo, Sanctus, Pater Noster, and Agnus Dei’ in Latin, wouldn’t they also be if they heard this sung in Hebrew, not knowing what it means? Does the average person in the pew know what ‘alleluja’ or ‘amen’ mean, let alone that they are based on Hebrew words? What then about Church Slavonic, Koine Greek, or Latin? They were all once the spoken languages of peoples and eventually fell into use only liturgically and for study.

    1. @John Kohanski – comment #2:
      One can view a sample of the score on the OCP website:
      http://cdn.ocp.org/shared/pdf/preview/30109031.pdf

      The Hebrew is not introduced until after the second verse as a response to the English text. It’s not until the final refrain that there is an option to sing the melody to the refrain in Hebrew, and even then with the possibility of the echo in English. So I don’t think there is danger of a confused congregation

      I’m grateful that Mr. Rosania has set this text in a unique and beautiful way. This particular line of scripture is our bishop’s motto, so a piece like this is particularly useful in our diocese.

  3. One of the gifts of the liturgy in the vernacular: every language is holy.

    I relish the parish liturgies where we manage to “hear from the world” with various pieces in English, Spanish, Latin, Greek, and Swahili. The “Lamb of God” trips off the tongue in Spanish with no hesitation after constant usage. So, a little Hebrew? Why not? Not because it is “holy” (or holier than any other language) but because God’s people encircle the globe and it’s good to know a little of the many languages of all God’s people.

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