Prayers of Thanksgiving, and Prayers for Election of a Pope

There will be more, much more, to say about the shocking news that His Holiness Pope Benedict XVI is resigning. Let our first response be prayer.

Prayer of Thanksgiving for the Ministry of Pope Benedict XVI:

O God, the Father of every gift,
we confess that all we have and are comes down from you;
teach us to recognize the effects of your boundless care
and to love you with a sincere heart
and with all our strength.
Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever.

Prayer for the Election of a Pope:

O God, eternal shepherd,
who govern your flock with unfailing care,
grant in your boundless fatherly love
a pastor for your Church
who will please you by his holiness
and to us show watchful care.
Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever.

 

11 comments

  1. 1. Thanks be to God!
    2. God bless Benedict for having the humility to step down. Will win him a lot of respect.
    3. DV Ben will not do anything to ensure only someone who follows his policies will succeed him.
    4. Over the next month, let’s pray hard each day: Come Holy Spirit…may the next pope get back to the vision of Vatican II
    5. Benedict gave up the papacy for Lent?!

  2. Thank you for a word of prayer–the only right response as surprises of God unfold. Yes, let us pray for Pope Benedict, and for all our Church, that the Holy Spirit will continue to guide us to greater peace and unity!

  3. I have been praying for a “new” Pope and “new” Bishops for some time now, I suspect I will continue to pray this way in the future.

    Of course I have let it up to God to determine how to bring into being that “newness.”

    I like the “resignation” answer. Now if only a lot of other Bishops might be inspired by Benedict’s example.

    1. @Jack Rakosky – comment #5:
      I like the “resignation” answer. Now if only a lot of other Bishops might be inspired by Benedict’s example.
      Great++++++ (can we make suggestions?)

  4. I have been praying for the next person to be elected Pope for a while now. It seems to me that the poor man — whoever it will be — needs a lot of help. But my prayer has been not so much for one specific version of Pope rather than another. Instead, I simply pray that God will prepare the poor guy’s heart and mind an body to be able to focus on what matters most: the Gospel, prayer, love, and a life lived in faith and humility.

  5. Some of the above remarks go far to reinforce the observation that there are quite a few among us who never believe that the Holy Spirit has been heard, or has acted, or that the ‘spirit of Vatican’ has been fulfilled unless their own subjective and cherished vision has been realised. Do these folk think (ever!) that the Holy Spirit’s action may be what is actually happening, that the vision of others beside themselves may be a legitimate part of the equation? That this pope was, in fact, the Holy Spirit’s choice and that the council’s ‘spirit’ had more facets than they might have preferred? Do they ever question their own infallibility?

    I have not agreed with all that our Holy Father Benedict did or exampled, but he did quite a lot more that I do agree with. However, whether or not I agree with it says nothing at all about its objective worth. Ditto some of the above remarks. In my opinion the Anglican Ordinariates alone go down in history as one of the most visionary and Vatican II-fulfilling papal acts in centuries! Too bad, though, for less lucidity in the matter of the SSPX and the institutionally inbred lack of responsibility in dealing with scandalous matters.

    May this pope enjoy a rich and rewarding retirement, and may we continue to be blessed with his wisdom. May he also receive that gratitude appropriate for his faithful and arduous, his somewhat unique and imaginative, guidance of St Peter’s barque.

    1. @M. Jackson Osborn – comment #8:
      In my opinion the Anglican Ordinariates alone go down in history as one of the most visionary and Vatican II-fulfilling papal acts in centuries!

      Really – history will eventually pass judgment but would predict that it will be passed over as an aberration or misguided attempt at ecumenism. Again, this ordinariates touch less than 10% of the world church – it is insignificant in the southern hemisphere. It reveals a European mindset and focus that history has passed.

      1. @Bill deHaas – comment #9:
        Oh dear me! I keep forgetting that European anything is to be avoided like the plague. Even those (you yourself?) of European heritage seem blithely glad to participate in their own cultural suicide. (None of the other cultures are being quite so obliging!)

        Actually, you may or may not be correct in your view of the ordinariates. True, they are but a drop in the bucket. Still, the very reality of their existence is nonetheless a visionary stroke of oecumenical zeal. It is nothing short of miraculous that the progeny of Reformation errors should be welcomed back into the fold with their own quite Catholic liturgical, spiritual and artistic heritage. This is, in fact, irksome to many very conservative Catholics; and irksome, as well, to many liberal Catholics who are displeased with our conservative liturgical praxis and music.

  6. Is it kosher for this evangelical catholic priest to pray for the election of the Pope? Based on my synod’s (LCMS) stand on doing things with others of different confessions, I suppose that if I pray privately, I am in good shape, but if I am invited to pray at an ecumenical Liturgy of Word and Prayer with the intentions going toward the election of the next Pope I could find myself having some ‘splaining” to do.

    As a duty and gift to the Church of my origin, I have been and will continue to pray for the election of a Pope who will ask Cardinal Ratzinger to, in his retirement, dedicate his time and considerable understanding towards dialogue and fellowship with Lutherans. What a gift of the 500th Anniversary of Luther posting his 95 Theses it would be that a form of Eucharistic sharing would be
    in place for this Anniversary….That would be cool!

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