“A deeper appreciation of what Mass means…”

Last week, the USCCB uploaded to YouTube an interview between Msgr. Jim Vlaun of Telecare TV and Archbishop Gregory Aymond about the upcoming Roman Missal, third edition. Watch it below.

HT: Roman Missal Changes blog (Our Sunday Visitor)

18 comments

  1. “There ‘s a lot of excitement!… The only changes are in words…” — odd conjunction of attitudes.

    “There has been a lot of enthusiasm around the country… Appreciation of the great gift of the Real Presence… the Word of God being proclaimed” — which have nothing to do with the new translation.

    “Fed at the Table of the Word and the Table of the Eucharist” — grand, but this general eucharistic catechesis has nothing to do with the selling of the new texts.

    “I would humbly ask them (pockets of opposition) to join us in communion and show we really can go forward… The reaction… has been extremely positive… open arms and eagerness to embrace this… We are on track… I don’t think it’s going to be a shocking experience at all.”

    Well, some people have been thrilled on first hearing the new texts prayed, and it’s true that the resistance put up by Msgr Ryan and Fr Ruff is a tiny phenomenon compared with the presumed acquiescence of the faithful.

  2. Exciting. Exciting. Exciting.

    If we hear the word often enough will people become excited about the Mass?

    Unlikely.

    Boring hymns. Boring homilies. Boring recitations of prayers.

    As it is now with the old missal,
    so it will be with the new missal,
    liturgical “revolutions” without end.

    Well, actually we will get some very, very boring catechesis to help keep us bored

    It is amazing how many liturgists, of the right or left,
    seem to think that if we just have enough boring catechesis
    that we will become excited about our boring celebrations.

    1. It is amazing how many liturgists, of the right or left,
      seem to think that if we just have enough boring catechesis
      that we will become excited about our boring celebrations.

      This is going in my “quotable” file.

    2. None of this applies in Canada at this point since no implementation date has yet been announced. I assume something will happen here in Advent though. We share many missalette resources with the US.
      I wonder how all this catechesis will play out in my little parish. Will there be a series of sermons beginning around August1? Announcements in the Bulletin after Labor Day? A fall series of DVD presentations? Or will we just do it cold turkey? I guess we’ll see.

  3. Those who have issues with the new translation are “not in communion with us?”

    Really?

    Since when is agreeing with fashion statements a requirement for being in communion with the bishops?

    1. And to read blogs that claim to know, this Archbishop is one of the new “shining lights.”

      Priest on screen left: “Most of the priests I come in contact with are all in favor of this.” That’s a surprise? (By the way, nice ring, Father!).

      Archbishop: “And we are on track. This is going to happen. We are on track.”

      Yup, there’s already been two batches of errata … right on track.

      Good grief!

    2. On February 15th I sent an e-mail to the USCCB Communications Department and asked if they would be posting a similar video interview with Archbishop Trautman. I also asked for clarification about the “not in communion with us” remarks. Here is their reply:

      From: CommDept
      To: russell wheeler
      Subject: RE: Roman Missal Video
      Date: Tue, 22 Feb 2011 16:10:00 +0000

      Thank you for your inquiry about the video interview with Archbishop Aymond. That video is featured on the USCCB Roman Missal website because Archbishop Aymond is the current chair of the Committee on Divine Worship. Other video presentations by members of the staff of the Secretariat of Divine Worship will be added shortly.

      The expression of concern about communion has to do with the expression of communion in the celebration of the Liturgy itself. It is not a matter of those who express concerns or raise questions about the Missal as a matter of debate, discourse, or dialogue, but about those who would choose not to celebrate the Liturgy according to the prescribed rites, i.e., those who might refuse to use the new Missal, because our communion within the Latin Church is expressed in our celebration of the same Liturgy. It will, therefore, be a matter of communion in the Liturgy once the new Roman Missal is in use.

      Department of Communications
      ~Catholic Communication Campaign
      ~Catholic News Service
      ~Creative Services
      ~Customer & Client Relations
      ~Media Relations

      Deepen Faith |Nurture Hope | Celebrate Life
      http://www.usccb.org

  4. I guess I am just in my own little bubble, since in real life (as opposed to on the internet) I have not met a single priest who is excited by the new translation. Resigned? Sure. Indifferent? Of course. But excited?

    1. Deacon Fritz-

      There are different sorts of excitement, you know. There’s “I just won the lottery!” excitement, which is very different from “There’s an armed robber in my house!” excitement. So maybe there is some ‘excitement’ out there after all. But it might, for other reasons, look a lot like resigned or indifferent.

    1. Father Blue, How true. That’s how the archbishop got his job, how most of his colleagues in the episcopate got their jobs, and how others to follow will get their jobs.

  5. FB….

    Doesn’t this say more about the priests than about the translation though? Both of our parish Priests are looking forward to the new translation. Hopping up and down excited? Probably not, but certainly not “resigned” and neither are they indifferent.

    Fr. Jim, et al…

    I think it is a serious mistake to assume that all, or even many of those who are supporting the new translation are ‘resigned” to accepting it, or otherwise doing so begrudgingly out of fear for their jobs. I work closely with many Priests and have discussed the new translation both in formal and informal settings… I feel like I have a pretty good sense of where those Priests actually are on the new translation. The good Archbishop’s description of “pockets of opposition” is about right. Sure, there’s opposition. Widespread but hidden under the surface out of fear? Hardly.

    As for the opposition needing to “join us in communion”…which the Archbishop then repeats….

    “the writing on the wall isn’t the spraypaint but the words it forms” (BeatStreet 1984)

    And so I ask serious question… what is the actual canonical status of a Priest who refuses to celebrate the Rite using the translation approved for Liturgical use? This is different from saying it in Latin because the Latin is approved for Liturgical use at all times, as is the 1962 Missale Romanum now. But there is, and will be only one English translation (without getting into the issue of Anglican Use) approved for use. Does anybody out there have the legal background in Canon Law to answer the question about not using the approved translation at Mass? Would the obstinate refusal to use the new translation have consequences?

    1. I don’t know. I suspect there will only be a few who will retain the use of ICEL1974. However I suspect there will be a vast number of excursions on the part of those adopting ICEL2010. Will the ones who still use ICEL1974 be technically schismatic? I doubt it. And the ones who take some excursions from the 2010 as corrective of some of its more blatant imperfections (“chalice,” “many,” “dewfall,” not to mention the gender-exclusive language)? Where do you draw the line, and who is going to police this?

      1. Where do you draw the line, and who is going to police this?

        Hmmm… perhaps there will be a new campaign – WWCD – (What would Charlemagne Do?). Perhaps by placing soldiers of the Holy Roman Empire in every church we could achieve uniformity? It worked for Frankish Chant….

  6. Ray Macdonald: None of this applies in Canada at this point since no implementation date has yet been announced. I assume something will happen here in Advent though. We share many missalette resources with the US.

    However, Rome is putting pressure on the Canadian Bishops to follow the same timetable as the United States, even if nothing has yet been announced. They seem to think that everyone in North America is the same…..

  7. Yes, we wait with bated breath for the multitudes to return to regular Mass attendance. Especially young people. The new changes to the liturgy will change everything! It converts the Mass from a predictable and uninspiring bore to something young people will be attracted to in their droves. No, really.

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