Paths Cross

The convention of the Latin Liturgy Association in Detroit is beginning just as the NPM convention is ending. Our paths are crossing in the hotel lobby. I hope to run into William Mahrt – I’m sure we both would enjoy catching up on the very latest on the episema and liquescent. I’m in town until tomorrow, so it just may work for me to attend their (ordinary form) sung Mass Saturday morning. That would be very nice. (Does anyone know what a faldstool is??)
awr

4 comments

  1. It’s a fancy folding chair. Similar to the ones we use with the card table for the kids at Thanksgiving dinner, only with fancy silk fabric and lots of gold leaf.

  2. Technically faldstools should fold, though I wouldn’t try it. A faldstool can also double as a prie-dieu.

    I don’t think that the rules concerning faldstool versus throne use are scrupulously followed. Traditional Catholics shouldn’t point fingers over rubrical “flexibility”. We do our fair share of blurring the rules. Seems like every prelate at a EF Mass gets to wear the cappa magna regardless of where the Mass takes place.

  3. I don’t think that the rules concerning faldstool versus throne use are scrupulously followed. Traditional Catholics shouldn’t point fingers over rubrical “flexibility”. We do our fair share of blurring the rules. Seems like every prelate at a EF Mass gets to wear the cappa magna regardless of where the Mass takes place.

    I think if you’re going to make accusations of people violating the rubrics you should be specific or be silent. The celebrations I’ve been involved in involve a tremendous amount of effort to ensure that the rules are properly adhered to, including the rules about Mass at the throne vs. Mass at the faldstool.

    1. I apologize. Perhaps I should not comment on what I see without knowing about the indults in advance. From an uninformed eye it does appear that certain regulated items such as cappae and thrones are used with an increasing regularity. This does not mean that they are used outside of the rubrics. Still, I sometimes wonder if the rediscovered enthusiasm for the cappa leans towards abuse. My traditional liturgical sensibilities are a bit simpler than others. Perhaps that informs my criticism.

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