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Archive for category Homiletics

Ars Predicandi: Jena Thurow’s Reflection for the Feast of St. Patrick

In the reading of the Confessions that we just heard, Patrick writes about “spending himself” in Ireland – in a land in which, though it and its people were foreign to him, he served as a witness…yet he constantly rejoiced and gloried in the name of the Lord.

Ars Praedicandi: Reflection from the Thursday after Ash Wednesday

“So as this Lent approached, I asked myself: How will I get through this Lent?”

Ars Praedicandi: Ed Foley’s Homily for the First Sunday of Lent, Year A

Maybe that is the new temptation:
Dismissive tweets displacing apples or bread,
pinnacles and parapets.

Ars Praedicandi: Preaching and “Themes”

“Themes” in preaching the seasons: A good idea all of the time? A good idea some of the time? A good idea none of the time?

Pope Francis on Lenten Fasting

Fast from words and be silent—so you can listen.

New Resource Site, “Preaching and Worship”

A new ecumenical website with helpful search filters for accessing resources for preaching and preparing liturgies

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Liturgy Lines: What’s Special about Matthew?

Matthew’s gospel begins with the reassurance that Jesus has come to be with us, and concludes with Christ’s promise to remain with us until the end of time.

Review of A Handbook for Catholic Preaching

Foley, Edward, gen. ed., with Catherine Vincie and Richard Fragomeni, ass. eds. A Handbook for Catholic Preaching. Collegeville, MN: The Liturgical Press, 2016. Cosponsored by The Catholic Association of Teachers of Homiletics and The Federation of Diocesan Liturgical Commissions, A Handbook for Catholic Preaching is an extraordinary resource. It provides in concise yet comprehensive format […]

Ars Praedicandi: Preaching the Beatitudes

We have two homilies to share today in the Pray Tell feature, Ars Praedicandi. Although both were delivered on the Fourth Sunday in Ordinary Time, using the same lectionary readings (Year A), each is unique—not only by virtue of the fact that they were delivered to different assemblies and in different places, but also in how they carry out their purpose. Seeing them side by side therefore gives us an opportunity to look at craft and style as well as content.

Ars Praedicandi: Preaching Church History

As often happens when a new bishop comes to town and tells everyone that they have been doing things wrong, particularly with regard to prayer and liturgy, the people of Constantinople would have none of this. They had called Mary “Mother of God” for years and were not about to change because of some bishop’s theological qualms.