Nuns in the Hood: 25 Years of Doing Good

And this will make your day: the inspiring story of Visitation Monastery, where nuns from a small inner-city monastery foster peace and love on Minneapolis’ North Side.

Visitation Nuns

The Star Tribune writes:

The “Nuns in the Hood,” as they’re known, are a beloved fixture at peace walks, vigils for the slain, and community causes.

They’ve thrown birthday parties and rounded up school supplies for children who otherwise would have none. They’ve opened their doors to those seeking peace, spiritual sustenance and forgiveness.

Recovering addict Eddie Brown, whom the nuns helped rescue from homelessness, says this:

“To me, the nuns are like angels come from a prayer because the things that they do in north Minneapolis are just unbelievable,” he said. “They’re always thinking of how they can help the neighborhood and the families.” … “They’re our nuns! Every neighborhood should have nuns in the hood!”

As one woman in the hood says:

And it actually makes me feel bad for other neighborhoods. Like, you don’t have a house with nuns? Don’t you just knock on the door and go pray?

Read the article and watch the video (page 2) here.

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3 comments

  1. I went to Medjugorje about 15 years ago. The tour group was led by a Dominican sister. One day, when we were walking alone, she pulled me aside and said, “Why do you think that I am not a nun if I don’t wear the habit?” I had never mentioned my doubt to anyone. I knew what the traditional Dominican habit looked like from an elderly sister who worked at my middle school. Sister must have suspected a dirty look. Or two.

    The Visitation sisters of the north side of Minneapolis perform a great service to the least of our brothers and sisters. And yet, I will not doubt that some will question the way they look. Was not John the Baptist a stranger for the way he looked? He knew Christ by his heart, and not by his human presentation.

    I wish the sisters many more years of their ministry. I commend their ability to be John the Baptists, looking past the appearance of the struggling to true humanity.

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